Dependent visa stamp for spouse or child

Your spouse or unmarried children under the age of 21 years may accompany you, or follow to join you in the U.S., in a dependent visa category (e.g., H-4 if you are in H-1B status, L-2 if you are in L-1 status) by making their own visa applications at a U.S. Consulate. We recommend that you review the particular requirements, hours of operation, and processing times of each consulate by visiting the Department of State website at http://usembassy.gov.

If your family members are applying with you, required documentation typically includes:

  • Marriage Certificate (to show relationship between you and your spouse); and/or
  • Birth Certificate (for a dependent child);
  • A Nonimmigrant Visa Application. Depending on the procedures in effect at the consulate where your family member is applying, he or she may be required to submit Form DS-156, the paper nonimmigrant visa application, or Form DS-160, the online nonimmigrant visa application;
  • Form DS-157, Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application, for all males ages 16-45, if required by the consulate; at its discretion, the consulate may require other applicants to submit this form. This form is not required at consulates using Form DS-160, the online non-immigrant visa application;
  • Form DS-158, Contact Information and Work History for Nonimmigrant Visa Applicants, for all F, J and M visa applicants, if required by the consulate. This form is not required at consulates using Form DS-160, the online nonimmigrant visa application
  • Form I-20, Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant Student Status, for F and M visa applicants;
  • Form DS-2019, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor Status (formerly Form IAP-66) for J visa applicants;
  • Valid passport;
  • One passport-style photograph. If you are submitting an electronic photo in connection with Form DS-160, see government photo specifications at http://travel.state.gov/visa/guide/guide_3877.html. If you are submitting the paper nonimmigrant visa application, Form DS-156, see government photo specifications at http://travel.state.gov/passport/guide/guide_2081.html;
  • Appropriate filing fees for the U.S. Consulate. (This fee differs for each consulate. Please refer to http://travel.state.gov/visa/frvi_fees.html.); and
  • Application fee, if applicable (http://travel.state.gov/visa/frvi/reciprocity/reciprocity_3272.html)

If your family members are NOT applying with you, required documentation typically includes:

  1. Documentation relating to the primary visa holder (i.e., you) consisting of:
    • The original Approval Notice for your sponsor/employer’s nonimmigrant visa petition on your behalf;
    • A copy of your sponsor/employer’s nonimmigrant visa petition filed with the USCIS; and
    • A copy of the visa stamp issued into your passport.
  2. Documentation of the applicant’s relationship to you:
    • Marriage Certificate (to show the relationship between you and your spouse); and/or
    • Birth Certificate (for a dependent child).
  3. Documentation in support of each dependent’s application:
    • A Nonimmigrant Visa Application (either Form DS-156 or Form DS-160, depending upon the consulate), duly completed and signed;
    • Valid passport;
    • One passport-style photograph;
    • Appropriate filing fees for the U.S. Consulate. (This fee differs for each consulate. Please refer to http://travel.state.gov/visa/frvi_fees.html.); and
    • Application fee, if applicable (http://travel.state.gov/visa/frvi/reciprocity/reciprocity_3272.html)

Some consular posts require fees to be paid in avance at a designated bank. Please refer to the appropriate consular website for more information.

Forms DS-156, DS-157 and DS-158 are available online at http://travel.state.gov/visa/frvi/forms/forms_1342.html. Form DS-160, the online non-immigrant visa application in use at some consulates, is available at https://ceac.state.gov/genniv/.

Note on passport validity: Ordinarily, you and your family members must possess passports that are valid for six months beyond the date for which your visa is requested. However, the United States has agreements with a number of countries under which passports valid for less than six months beyond the visa date will be accepted. These countries are: Algeria, Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belgium, Bolivia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cote D’ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Hong Kong (Certificates of identity & passports), Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Korea, Kuwait, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Macau, Madagascar, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Zimbabwe.

Related

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